Monday, June 30, 2014

About Time

About time.
Opening time.
The beginning of time.
Where does time come from?
Where has the time gone?
A long time.
A short time.
No time.
Zero time.
Time and a half.
Overtime.
All-time.
In the meantime.
A sense of time.
Telling time.
The test of time.
Time will tell.
Set the time.
Clocktime.
At the tone, the time will be.
Time zones.
Time's arrow.
High time.
A fine time.
The use of time.
Time and money.
Time is money.
Being and time.
Being on time.
Enough time.
Quality time.
Spending time.
Playtime.
Me time.
We time.
Father Time.
Taking time.
Tea time.
Stolen time.
Lost time.
Waste time.
Find time.
Make up time.
Time is of the essence.
All the time in the world.
Trying times.
The Texture of Time.
A rough time.
The best of times, the worst of times.
The test of time.
Doing time.
Serving time.
Treading time.
Nap time.
Reading time.
Playing for time.
Time and motion.
Ragtime.
Stoptime.
Old time.
Recent times.
Half time.
Time and Tide.
Time for good behavior.
Time served.
Time travel.
Time creeps along.
Time flows.
Time flies.
The time ahead.
The time until.
Call time.
Time off.
Time out.
Time in.
Time running out.
Time on our hands.
Time to run.
Filling time.
Treading time.
Good timing.
Bad timing.
Timing is everything.
Time on our side.
Closing time.
Endtime.

3 comments:

Juhani Nuorvala said...

That's very close to, almost a variation of, Andy Warhol's poem 'About time' from his book 'From A to B and Back Again'. Was that intentional? Yours is longer. His starts: "From time to time / Do time / Time yourself" and concludes with: "Time card / Time lapse / Time zone // The beforetime / The meantime / The aftertime / The All-time — ".

Daniel Wolf said...

I don't know the Warhol poem, thanks for the reference. This wasn't thought of as a poem (actually that thought sort of horrifies me), it's just some some brainstorming on paper for a chapter about about time in general for a book on rhythm that I'll probably never have the time to finish.

Juhani Nuorvala said...

Ok! Not sure if Warhol thought of his list as a poem either although it's printed so that it looks like one. And in Warhol's case, who actually wrote it is another question. Anyway, I've long been thinking about setting his text to music.